FaceApp—One of the Best 2017 Apps - Global Photography

FaceApp—One of the Best 2017 Apps

FaceApp is selected one of the 25 Best New Apps of 2017 by Fast Company. Despite the previous accuse of being reacist and the follow-up pulling of ethnicity filters, it gained popularity. And the reason for being selected is as follows:


Change your face. Using neural networks, FaceApp can analyze portrait images and change faces from frowning to smiling, young to old, or even man to woman. The fact that it actually works has helped propel FaceApp to more than 45 million downloads since its launch in January, but not without a couple of embarrassing missteps. The makers of Faceapp apologized in April for a “beautifying” filter that made black people’s faces look whiter, and again in August for a short-lived set of “ethnicity filters.” FaceApp encapsulates both the power of AI and the fallibility of the humans programming it.



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